Volume 7 (2000)

raven7Available: in print, online (links below)

Raven continues its tradition of publishing outstanding articles in the field of flags. This year’s volume presents five papers that have won the Driver Award, the pinnacle of scholarship among Association members. The award, presented for the best paper presented at an annual meeting, honors Captain William Driver, who originated the phrase “Old Glory” to refer to the U.S. flag. It also includes a tribute to the dean of vexillology, Dr. Whitney Smith.


Fascinating Flags of Plundering Pirates and Profiteering Privateers
Robert S. Gauron, Chief Statistical Editor (ret.), World Book Encyclopedia, Wausaukee, Wisconsin
The long-time editor of the World Book’s “Flag Article” takes readers on a delightful voyage through the history of pirates, privateers, and their flags. Exciting illustrations accompany this, the first paper to win the Driver Award. (1979)

Also available from PDC


The Signal and Commercial Flags of St. John’s, Newfoundland c.1500-c.1900
Mark A. B. Le Messurier, former flag manufacturing consultant, Toronto, Ontario
The port city of St. John’s, as the capital of Britain’s oldest colony, developed a strong history of complex and evolving flag use. Narrated by a St. John’s native with original research and detailed flag charts, this paper covers 400 years of flags in service of the city’s commerce. (1990)

Also available from PDC


The Flag Monument in Rosario, Argentina
Gustavo Tracchia, Neubecker Laureate of the Centro Interdisciplinario de Estudios Culturales, Kew Gardens, New York
When the liberator General Belgrano raised the first Argentine flag in the little town of Rosario in 1812, he little imagined the great monument that would rise to commemorate the event. The author traces the monument’s history through nearly a century of controversy to today. (1996)

Also available from PDC


American-Influenced Flags in Lower Canada
Luc Baronian, Ph.D. student in Linguistics, Stanford University
In the 1830s, two factions of the Patriote Party in the valleys of the Ottawa and St. Lawrence Rivers used flags indicating their sympathies. The author shares his research, conclusions, and insights into a flag history that extends to the modern Québécois separatist movement. (1998)

Also available from PDC


Evolution of the U.S. National Air Ensign: 1861-Present
John H. Gámez, formerly U.S. Navy, San Antonio, Texas
The United States has displayed distinguishing marks on all of its military aircraft, from the observation balloons of the Civil War, through the airplanes of the First and Second World Wars, to today’s cruise missiles. Lavish illustrations show how the U.S. insignia have changed and adapted over time. (1997)

Also available from PDC


  • Edward B. Kaye, Managing Editor
  • Editorial Board:
  • Scot M. Guenter, San José State University
  • Anne M. Platoff, Arizona State University
  • John M. Purcell, Cleveland State University (emeritus)